It’s only taken two years and ten months, but the Eastern shacks I bought from Mike Parker of Battlefield Accessories are complete! They turned out very nicely too. I recommend them.

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As you can see, the roofs are detachable and each shack almost holds a fire team.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I think I have enough Russian buildings for now. I really need to concetrate on AFVs and guns. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I’ll only buy more Eastern Front buildings if they turn up for good prices at Swap & Sells.

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Peter’s new KV-1’s

June 18, 2014

Hello all, yes, a rare post from the Eastern Funker.

Peter’s been working on a new company of KV-1 heavy tanks.

He’s been experimenting with a weathering powder. I think the experiment has been a huge success!

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I purchased a transaprent plastic rod from a manufacturer last year. I wanted to use it to place aeroplanes on when basing them for wargzming, so that rather than having to disguise a piece of wire or solid rod, its transparency would negate the need.

The rod was a metre long (and has a diameter of 12mm), which might make the height of the plane on the wargaming table more realistic, but it would be impractical. Altering the length and shape of the rod would thus be crucial.

A hacksaw cut through it nicely: Experiments 1  – so perpendicular cuts are OK.

What about a diagonal cut? To position the plane on the rod so that it looks like it’s dive-bombing or strafing, a diagonal cut (or a few of them) would be required. Well, here’s multiple attempts: Experiments 2 – as you can see, a bit ‘iffy’. Now, I need to acknowledge that I was not using a clamp to hold the rod still, nor was I using a new or very fine hacksaw blade. Both of those things would help enormously.

Then I needed to know if I could file it: Experiments 3 – I filed the end of a perpendicular cut, then began filing diagonally to see if there was any difference. As you can see, it files very nicely (and I wasn’t using a good quality file).

Lastly, I wondered if it could be cut, or at least shaved, with a good knife. The answer was no to cutting, and not really with shaving: Experiments 4 – filing would be a much better way of getting rid of some girth, instead of trying to shave it off with a knife.

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Today’s swap & sell was cancelled. Next one is the IPMS one on Queens’ Birthday weekend monday.

 

Chris Kemp has posted a brief but novel explanation on his blog about creating canvases/tarps and then getting the sag right when they are on frames. I hadn’t thought of getting sag using something like thin/flexible wire…I use rigid things like bulldog clips or clothespegs. Those methods of mine won’t really work for this sort of thing…this copper wire idea is simple and practical, and I should have some floating around the house or the shed somewhere.

Of course, I’ve always had pliers at the hobby table – they are necessary for when I’m working with wargaming figures made of various white metals or lead/pewter compounds (none of which are WWII, so you don’t see them here).

Does anyone else have any cool ways for improvising tarps/canvases when arranged on the frames of AFVs and other vehicles? Suggest them in the Comments!

 

Two years ago I explained and demonstrated (with photos and all) how I made my wargaming smoke markers – if you don’t remember, click on this link. I’ve been very happy with them ever since and they have been serving me very faithfully, with no problems whatsoever.

Well, Paul from “Plastic Warriors 1/76 & 1/72 Plastic Soldiers,Armour & Aircraft” has shared on his blog how his mate Dave makes wargaming smoke markers. I was very impressed! Not only are the materials pretty easy to come by, there are times when a smoke marker having some sort of flat base to correctly position it (or anchor it, if you play outdoors and it’s a bit breezy) is  a great idea. Mrs Funker, like Paul’s wife, would not be happy with using the family oven for drying – I think sun-drying during the summer or indoors for a few days in a quite-warm, low-humidity room in winter would do the job adequately…after all, if not perfectly dry after a couple of days, it’s very easy to just put them outside again during the next sunny spell…

Anyway. This is something I will remember for next time I need to make smoke markers…and I may even ‘base’ a couple of my existing ones using my current supply of caulk, sheet styrene cut to appropriate sizes and shapes, and paint. Thanks Paul, and thanks Dave!

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The blog ‘War and game’ is gone – it ceased being accessible last year, and I mentioned this on this post here.

But I didn’t remove the link and kept forgetting to do so every time I logged in to WordPress.

Realising today that I really need to do a little cleaning up and re-organising around here, I have removed it from my Links…

…and added a new link!

Chris Kemp’s blog “Not Quite Mechanised: Fastplay Operational-Level Tabletop Wargaming” http://notquitemechanised.wordpress.com/ is taking up the slack! It’s a blog about 20th Century wargaming, and one tank model on the table represents a whole company (which s quite different to ‘Panzerfaust: Armoured Fist’, which is 1:1). There are great photos, plus progress reports and lots more. So, welcome Chris!

If you don’t know about the TV version of The Wombles books, educate yourself on YouTube here.

I’ve been doing a bit of Wombling lately…

someone at work had bought an Eee Slate and threw out the box and packaging: Wombling 1 . The cardboard packaging was of no value to me, but wait…: Wombling 2 – could that be a useful plastic tray? Let’s have a look: Wombling 3 – why yes, it is! A nice size for a lap, with a nice, sturdy carry rim: Wombling 4 and good depth too, probably an inch deep: Wombling 5 . Great! This will be useful for sorting out bits and pieces when assembling individual 1:72 scale figures, or for sorting out vehicular stowage and other small odds & ends. I might even use it to catch the pieces of flashing when cleaning sprues with a scalpel. So, useless plastic to one is a handy hobby tray to another.

Next up: Christmas present packaging. Two presents came with transparent plastic lids:  Wombling 6 . The first one is a perfect, flat sheet – I’ll cut off the 90 degree angle sides and discard them (they are too small and I can’t be bothered keeping every last scrap of everything): Wombling 7 . I have used pieces like this to make wargaming rivers in the past (for a smaller scale of wargaming, different period and different rule set). They turn out really well, too! The second one has some shaping moulded into it, so it’s not a single perfect sheet: Wombling 8 . With the shaping bits removed, there’s plenty left to use for windshields, aircraft canopies, building windows, etc.

So, some rubbish that might end up as landfill will be given a second life on the wargames table. As Paul from Plastic Warriors would say, “Model on!!!”

 

Stephen C. Willoughby wrote a brilliant article for his local chapter of IPMS called

How Tanks Get Dirty: A column about tanks by an ex-tanker.

I found it the first time whilst reading more after learning the ‘Doug Chaltry technique’ and then lost it’s location because I forgot the keywords I used to find it the first time.

I recently rediscovered it and am glad that some of what he wrote had stuck with me and that I am going part of the way to reproducing armour that has been out & about as opposed to fresh off the assembly line or kept in a museum. And I wanted to share it with you!

 

I’ve always wondered about headswaps. Paul and Al do them and do them successfully. I’ve tried a couple of times and only got 1 in 10 to work, and the amount of effort seemed excessive.

Ben B from Ben’s Soldiers shows us how he does his. He makes it look so easy. Thanks Ben!

 

Thanos, over at his Miniatures and Terrain blog, recently did a great post about making your own sandbags and then painting them.

I like it because he is working with some of the same paints that I am (Citadel, by Games Workshop) and he makes everything look so easy and professional.

What are you waiting for? Go have a look!

 

1) Check part fit before assembly.

2) When assembling hull and superstructure, assemble both at the same time and ensure they fit OK…don’t let the hull be too narrow and prevent fitting the superstructure to the rest of the vehicle!

3) Are all link&length track pieces facing in the same direction AS INDICATED IN THE INSTRUCTIONS (not as decided by one’s good self)? If not, expect bulges…they have designed the links to face one way only, and they won’t sit nicely if you do it in the opposite direction.