It’s only taken two years and ten months, but the Eastern shacks I bought from Mike Parker of Battlefield Accessories are complete! They turned out very nicely too. I recommend them.

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As you can see, the roofs are detachable and each shack almost holds a fire team.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I think I have enough Russian buildings for now. I really need to concetrate on AFVs and guns. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I’ll only buy more Eastern Front buildings if they turn up for good prices at Swap & Sells.

StuG IIIB by Trumpeter

August 20, 2014

I went to this year’s IPMS Swap and Sell last sunday, at a new venue at Ashburton Scout Hall. I was very happy to find (and purchase!) a Trumpeter StuG IIIB:

StuG IIIB. I already have assembled and painted the Ausf. C/D version that Trumpeter make, and have a second one waiting it’s turn. They are nice little kits, pretty well detailed but not too difficult to assemble (and they paint up splendidly) – here, have a look inside the B’s box: StuG IIIB 2 . The commander’s hatch on this kit is clsoed, unlike the C/D. That may or may not be of interest to you, as skilled modellers can always kitbash to get what they want.

For now, this is another kit to add to the stash. Three early war StuG III’s, to go with my Panzer III’s. I’m slowly expaning across the entire 4 year duration of the Eastern Front!

 

Hello! It’s been a while. And I have another post to do tomorrow or Friday.

But- this doesn’t mean I’m back. These are some of the intermittent appearances I may make. After all, I haven’t switched off transmissions for good yet…

Peter (co-author of the Panzerfaust: Armoured Fist rules) finished working on the Plastic Soldier Company 1/72nd Russian 45mm anti tank guns that he purchased some time ago. Here are his proud pics: 1DSCF45mmL66 2DSCF45mmL66 3DSCF45mmL66 4DSCF45mmL66 5DSCF45mmL66 . Look great, don’t they? Better than what I do! He commented that: “The guns had very few pieces, but the crew had to be stuck together, but looked awesome once done. There were four guns and crews in the box, and there were options to do the 45mmL46 or the 76mm infantry gun. Awesome value for one kit”.

~~~

He and I will be having a game of Panzerfaust:Armoured Fist in a fortnight. First game for me this year!

I see this on the shelves of a hobby retailer in the city last Monday. $22 was the asking price. I was going to buy one, but I felt that it was too Western European and so not much good to me at the moment.

It’s very straightforward…glue the four walls together, glue the corner brickwork on to cover the seams where the walls get glued together, glue the roof together then do the little detail bits and pieces. Apart from waiting for glue to dry, should be very quick.

Here’s Armourfast’s own description – tells you even about the colour of the plastics used, for painting consideration!

 

There are a couple of lowlights to this product, however.

The roadwheels are cast as one piece, whereas in reality they were two separate wheels with a gap inbetween for the track guide teeth:   – now, I’m reliably informed by far more experienced reviewers that making model kits is extremely difficult and all molds used to cast model kit pieces will always have some drawbacks…this is one of the drawbacks here. Given that where the gap will be should end up painted black anyway (to represent the rubber on the rim of the roadwheel) then it shouldn’t be too much of a problem.

The other lowlight is the hull machinegun:   .

I’m going to to follow the advice of others and remove it. I’ve got plenty of ESCI/Italeri surplus machineguns lying around in my spares box… I’ll cut one up and use it instead.

I’ve got some other kits on the go at the moment, but these are definitely going to be moved up the priority list – they will be comparatively quick to do, as it’s mostly just painting!

There are a few highlights to these fast-build kits by PSC.

First, you get not one, but two commander figures for each tank:  – check out the sculpting! Nicely done, will drybrush/highlight/wash up very nicely. Plus a spare commander to use elsewhere.

Second, you get stowage such as jerrycans:  and spare roadwheels:  .

Third, you get pre-made track sag:    .

I don’t have to break out the cut-off matchsticks, cut-off icecream sticks and cut-off chopsticks that I would normally use to try to replicate track sag with!

I completed my Soviet Armoured Car Company, bringing it to the recommended strength of five vehicles thanks to finishing the final three earlier this week. The final three are a BA-I (БА-И), BA-6 (БА-6) and BA-10 (БА-10). You’ll recall the first two vehicles of this company, finished back in February, were a BA-9 (БА-9) and a BA-6M. Here’s the whole company:  and from the air:  .

Here are the three recently completed vehicles together:   .

Here’s the  BA-I (БА-И) by itself:  . Now the BA-10 (БА-10):  . Lastly the funky-looking BA-6 (БА-6), first from the side  and then three quarter profile:  …great idea, just to whack the tank turret from the T-26 onto the armoured car body…

I really like this camouflage (камуфляж) scheme, that I got from this link: “BA-6 from the Separate Recon Battalion /1st Tank Division/1st Mechcorps, The North-western Front, Krasnogvardeysk (Gatchina) region, August 1941″ – it’s lots of fun to paint.

If you look closely at those trees in the background, you might recognise some of them from this earlier post of mine.

So, in the space of a few months I’ve added two more companies to my Soviet forces. That’s enough for now, as they are not my primary army. It’d be good to pick up a couple of Airfix T-34s (as kits or assembled) so I could complete my company of T-34/76s, but I’ve not seen any at the swap & sells this year…funny, as there were plenty of them around in the previous few years.

Now, strictly speaking the rules state that all vehicles in a company must look the same so they cannot be confused as others. I’m going to argue that they all have the same basic body and will play all as the same type, even if they actually are different models that I have. A whole company for $50 as opposed to having to pay full price for the same UM kit new…$225 for a company?! Sorry. I’m on a budget,these trainees aren’t cheap to train.

I’ll reiterate what I said about rubber tyres from the SU-85 kits (those were UM kits; these BA’s are UM kits too and they have real rubber tyres) – great if you can do them perfectly, but I cannot and so I have to paint over them, sometimes numerous times…and the effort to get them onto the hubcabs is a nuisance too. I’m happy with plastic tyres.

 

 

 

Need WWII Russians?

September 15, 2012

Anyone modelling or wargaming the WWII Eastern Front (Ostfront) will need WWII Russians and plenty of them. This morning I’ve just read very high praise indeed for a new set of 1/72 Russians, Zvezda’s Set 8077, Soviet Infantry Platoon. Now, these figs are not intended for any particular wargames ruleset (although Zvezda do publish a ruleset called Art of Tactic) so you can use them with any ruleset, such as ‘Panzerfaust: Armoured Fist’. After all,  ‘Panzerfaust: Armoured Fist’ is a platoon level and company level game – Zvezda are selling you a whole platoon. Or you could just use individual figures for modelling dioramas.

Plastic Soldier Review has given this set of 38 figures four 10/10’s and one 9/10. Their review concludes: “The positive aspects of this set are many, and we have already gushed enough about them here. The negative points are limited to this being a time-consuming set to put together (some will see that as no great loss, and of course many will enjoy the experience anyway), and the noticeably well-equipped and neat/uniform appearance of the men – a feature that is hardly uncommon of many plastic soldiers in this scale and beyond. In a word – excellent. In two words – buy it!”

So – there you go.

I’ve been really busy supervising Trainee Funker, but I do get the occasional moment to look at my hobbies too. I’m pleased to report that, with the glorious sunny & warm Spring weather yesterday (and with Trainee Funker using his free time to nap), I finished the UM Models/UniModels SU-85s I’ve been working on for some time.

Here they are, with the one I completed some months ago on the left side facing right, and the other four I completed yesterday in the middle and on the right side, facing left:  . Detail of the company commander’s vehicle:  . Details of the muddiest vehicle – but it gets far muddier on the Eastern Front:  . A few of the vehicles on a different angle:  . An aerial view:  – it helps bring out the detail courtesy of the PE/photoetched brass grill on the back of each vehicle. Here’s the company commander’s tank again:  just to show the proper colour that I used (Citadel’s Catachan Green) – and again to show the side in the shade:  .

I’m glad they are finished. I especially found the roadwheels troublesome, both during assembly and painting. Having real rubber may be authentic, but it’s only authentic if no accidents happen to them like glue drips on them or paint splashes on them. If those happen, it’s all wasted, because then you have to paint the whole black rubber tyre black to cover up your mistakes.

I still like UM kits – I think they are pretty detailed and they do cover some creations no-one else covers. But any future purchases by me will exclude kits involving real rubber tyres wherever possible.

Nunawading Wargames Association (NWA) is the wargaming club I belong to, and have done for almost two decades.

I toddled along to have a look at what my fellow members were demonstrating for the annual Open Day, which is six hours of participatory and demonstration games for the public to take part in.

To be fair to my blog, I’ll only show you WWII Eastern Front, which was being run by my good colleague cheetah185, and whose blog In my own time I have already linked to (see my set of links to other blogs). Cheetah185 and mates were running a Stalingrad game. Here’s their explanation to the public of what is being presented:  . Here’s the map/board:    – notice all the aircraft? Russian fighters and German bombers. Here are photos of the action:      .

I did some shopping – I had to! I bought a Raupenschlepper Ost with Flak kit by ACE Models and I bought four resin Russian shacks from Mike Parker @ Battlefield Accessories:  . The Russian shacks will serve as animal pens, wood sheds, farm worker’s shelters, hunter’s lodges or whatever they are required for. Here are photos of the details of these shacks:    and for scale purposes, here’s a BA armoured car parked right next to/in front of one:  .