It was lovely weather for a swap & sell, and Mrs Funker & Trainee Funker joined me for the drive (although not for the event itself). I didn’t get there an hour early and queue as per normal…Trainee Funker being so full of beans, we were too busy getting him ready and time just slipped away. After parking the car, I was walking up the hill to the venue when good blokes & fellow NWA‘rs Sean and Neil pulled up next to me. We went in together after some light banter and catching up about events at NWA.

The traders were really well arranged – kudos to ESSMC management for doing such a great job with such limited space. Here’s some of what was on sale:

Mar 2013 s&s other stuff 1 Mar 2013 s&s other stuff 2 Mar 2013 s&s other stuff 3 Mar 2013 s&s other stuff 4 Mar 2013 s&s other stuff 5 Mar 2013 s&s other stuff 6 Mar 2013 s&s other stuff 7

I didn’t find any kits on my Wanted list, but came away with some books: The loot from ESSMC's March 2013 Swap & Sell – I was loaned “Tank versus Tank” two years ago by Kim from NWA and wanted to photocopy the whole thing, so impressed was I by it…but I only copied my legal 10%. To find it on sale was fantastic – even the vendor, just as I picked it up, sung it’s praises and I told him how I’d already read it and loved it…$20 was no problem at all.

The foreign armour book will be useful for doing “Beute” stuff for both my major belligerents on the Ostfront…and “PzKpfw IV” was a mandatory for my personal library.

So, no kits, but some great books. Sometimes it’s like that!

 

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(I do not get any commissions from people for this blog).

My colleague Stephen AKA cheetah185 (from the In my own time wargaming blog) passed along this vendor for consideration:

Early War Miniatures

Why are they notable? Because they do 20mm scale figures for the following:

French Army 1939 to 1943
British Empire 1930 till 1943
Dutch Army of 1940
Belgian Army of 1940
Norwegian Army of 1940
Polish Army of 1939
German Army Early War 1938 1942
Italian Army 1936 till 1943
Japanese Imperial Army
Other nations & export arms
Greek Army 1938 till 1941

As most of you would realise, two of those are Eastern Front, and the others round out a number of nations that are not currently well represented in plastic. Have a look and see what you think.

***

AAR from my trip to the first swap & sell of the year will be posted this Easter weekend.

 

 

Attention all Melbourne and surrounding localities modellers:

The annual Eastern Suburbs Scale Modelling Club Swap & Sell is on this sunday morning (10 March), 10am – 1pm. Venue: Box Hill Community Arts Centre in Station Street, Box Hill 3128.

The corner of Combarton St and Station Street…

$2 to get in, with drinks and BBQ foods for sale as well – but of course the main attraction is of course, the model kits, hobby books, hobby magazines, reference/historical books and hobby supplies.

Here’s a link (but I’ve already provided the main details above).

I know that it’s a long weekend, but it’s a Swap & Sell! And it’s the first one of the year; first one in over 4 months…

Chris Kemp has posted a brief but novel explanation on his blog about creating canvases/tarps and then getting the sag right when they are on frames. I hadn’t thought of getting sag using something like thin/flexible wire…I use rigid things like bulldog clips or clothespegs. Those methods of mine won’t really work for this sort of thing…this copper wire idea is simple and practical, and I should have some floating around the house or the shed somewhere.

Of course, I’ve always had pliers at the hobby table – they are necessary for when I’m working with wargaming figures made of various white metals or lead/pewter compounds (none of which are WWII, so you don’t see them here).

Does anyone else have any cool ways for improvising tarps/canvases when arranged on the frames of AFVs and other vehicles? Suggest them in the Comments!

 

3D Printing is a technology that those of us in libraries need to be thinking about at the moment. Phil Bradley has already done so on his blog. (If you want further explanation about the technology itself, then here’s a ‘How Stuff works” entry about 3D Printing).

My employer (an academic library) has already received a user request asking when we will set up a 3D Printer, for the Engineering students.

I began wondering how such a machine could be used for miniatures and for wargaming. Seems I’m not alone – John Lambshead, writer of the blog John’s Toy Soldiers, has done so already.

There’s also been discussions about it on a number of hobby forums – for example:

Copyright and Intellectual Property will play big roles in how hobby people use the technology. For now, the cost seems pretty limiting – but probably in 5 years’ time they will be accessible and reasonably priced.

Anyways, food for thought at the start of the New Year 2013.

 

 

This last game of Panzerfaust: Armoured Fist (click this link to get the rules for free) for 2012 was to be an Encounter scenario, using forces most likely to represent reconnaissance forces. The date is March, 1942. The failed drive to Moscow is a fresh and sore memory.

Forces are searching for each other in the regions west of Moscow. For Weather, a 6 was rolled – Clear. For Wind, a 1 – Still.

Here’s the map/board for the night: 1 Map 1 2 Map 2

Turn 1:

The Germans 3 details 1 could already see a company of BA armoured cars that were advancing at high speed. I order to try to reach better positions before engaging, I decided the Germans would all move at Full Movement speed.

More Russians then came into view after my movement, including infantry on horseback 4 details 2 .

The Russians had already set up some anti-tank guns 5 Russian 45mm L 56 ATGs . A 45mm L56 fired on a Pz 38(t) but missed. Being a small gun and at some distance, the Germans couldn’t see its muzzle flash and so couldn’t try to fire speculatively at it.

Russian 122mm artillery is attempted to be called down onto the Pz 38(t)’s. An 8 is required; a 4 is rolled. It’ll come down next turn (Peter did this too late in the turn and so penalised himself by delaying its arrival).

Turn 2:

All German forces continued moving at full speed 6 Germans moving at full .  The Russian 45mm L56 on the hill fired again, missing again. The BA company 7 What the Germans could see  all fire at my Pz 38(t) platoon and all miss. The Russian artillery comes down but only affects a Pz 38(t) on the wing, Stunning it for 2 turns.

Turn 3:

I roll 5 pips for my actions. Good, I need it to get everyone firing at the Communist hordes. I choose to continue advancing the company as a whole (so my two motorised infantry platoons continue to move forward to optimal combat positions) 8 Germans continuing to move at full but I spend pips halting my two armour platoons.

My SdKfz 222’s roll brilliantly, and cause three BA’s to be tracked. The Pz 38(t)’s hit the same BA’s, knocking the gun out on one and causing the crews to bail out of two others 10 Russians taking hits too .

As a result of this savage fighting, the BA company have to test morale. They are Stunned for 6 turns! But – they can still shoot, it just means they can’t advance – so I still have to be careful.

By now the other Russian 45mm anti-tank guns are set up and open fire, knocking out a Pz 38(t). Another hits my already-Stunned Pz 38(t) causing it to be tracked, then a third hit forces its crew to bail out  . I have to test the Morale of the Pz 38(t) platoon. I roll a 7, which is modified to 5 because of the Russian artillery fire, so we are fine (a roll that ends up being modified to 2 or below is bad).

A SdKfz 222 is hit and the crew bail out 9 Germans taking hits . I test the platoon’s morale – 3 – they are Shaken. I rolled to see how many turns they are Shaken for – 6! Drat.

Now I test my company’s Morale. 7, modified to 6; no problem.

Turn 4:

I move everyone, armour at full speed but infantry at 5cm so that the infantry vehicles (SdKfz 251/10’s) can shoot. Some infantry vehicles have stopped moving, allowing the troops to race into the buildings 11 Turn4 results 1 .

There is mass Russian shooting. A Pz 38(t) is tracked. My SdKfz 251/1’s use their LMGs to wipe out some Russian infantry with AT rifles.

The tracked Pz 38(t) fails his Morale check but the rest of the platoon passes.

Turn 5:

My infantry have all leaped off their 251/1’s and 251/10’s (apart from those needed to operate those vehicles’ weapons). Some are able to swarm into the hamlet’s hall (the game’s objective) and surrounding houses. But they lie low, as the Russians don’t know they are there and the opportunity to ambush is too good to pass up.

My SdKfz 222’s use their LMGs and 20mm cannons on the second platoon of 45mm L56’s, wiping out the whole platoon at once. But it’s not all good news, as the German guns and Russian guns have simultaneous firing times – so the L56’s shoot and score three hits on the SdKfz 222’s, killing the platoon commander and causing the others to surrender to the Russians.

I test my company Morale – 8 – fine.

A 251/10 lands a shell on a BA and stuns it.

My 50mm infantry mortars fail to land their shells on opposing Russian footsloggers. The 251/1’s let rip with their LMGs at the same footsloggers and kill a few 12 Turn5 results 1 .

My other 251/10 is destroyed and that platoon’s Morale fails.

I test the whole (surviving) company Morale – 5, modified to 1…Shaken. I can’t advance, but I’m still in the game 13 Turn5 results 2 .

Turn 6:

We declared this would be the final turn, as it was 11.30pm.

The 45mm L56’s on the hill hit my Pz 38(t)’s and kill the platoon HQ; the game ended right there 14 Turn6 as my Morale was now too low to continue fighting.

So I lost (as usual) but this time did reach the objective and occupy it (briefly). I’m improving each year! 1 win, 3 losses for 2012. Next year, I want to have 2 wins and 2 losses.

***

Here are some photos of other games being played at NWA that night:

Other games 1 Other games 2 Other games 3 Other games 4 Other games 5 Other games 6 . Those Warhammer 40K dudes? some of them are Stephen/cheetah185’s. You can see photos of his Warhammer 40K project on his blog, In my own time.

 

 

Trainee Funker was not obeying any orders for a while during last saturday morning and I nearly didn’t get to go to Bayonet Military Model Club’s modelling competition & swap ‘n sell YET AGAIN…however, he finally responded to discipline and so I was able to hit the Western Ring Road and Princes Highway down to Werribee.

The trip is worth it for the B-24 Liberator alone. Here are my photos – approaching the restoration hanger (the competition and swap ‘n sell is inside, along with the plane):  , and now inside, looking at real, restored history:  ,  ,  ,  ,  , some of the business purposes of the vehicle –  , great campaign pitch  – hard to say ‘no’ to that!,  ,  , “pilot to gunner!” –  ,  ,  ,  , again the business reasons –   , their contact details on their advertising trailer if you want to find out more:  .

I scored pretty heavily at this swap ‘n sell:  .

  • 2 T-34/76’s (in 1:76 scale, though) to add to my existing 8 which gives me a complete company;
  • 2 250/9’s which added to my existing kits now gives me two platoons and a spare of these recon vehicles;
  • 2 recovery KVs for particular scenarios;
  • 3 KV-2’s which, if I add to my existing 3, gives me more than a company. But the first three KV-2’s I assembled and painted weren’t painted very well, so I might just give them to Trainee Funker when he’s older and start afresh with these;
  • 3 ISU-152s to add to my existing three which gives me a company plus a spare;
  • a total of five KV-1’s (there is no real difference between these two kits) which is a whole company straight off. I already have a whole company of KV-1’s, in the same situation as my KV-2’s. Two companies? Or one for me and one for the Trainee?

Pretty darned good, if you’ll agree. Plus, all those PST kits were a paltry $5 each, all sealed and in perfect condition. So, $65 bought 13 kits. All the above cost a total of $99.

Here are ‘drool’ photos of some of what was available:  (a fair whack of this stuff can home with me – this was taken upon my arrival at the venue);  ; wow, 1/ 6 scale stuff!:  ;  ;  ;  ;  ; even 1/1 scale stuff for re-enactors…  .

A great way to spend a morning. See some real history and buy some small-scale plastic replica history. Thanks for organising it, Bayonet Military Model Club, and I hope to attend every year from now on!

Bayonet Military Model club, located in Werribee in Melbourne’s western suburbs, has their annual model competition and swap n’ sell coming up this saturday. This is an event that I have not been able to attend for various reasons over the years, and I was adamant that this year I would go. Even with having Trainee Funker, I would go. Nothing would stop me.

So far, I’m on track to go. I have my updated shopping list ready and Mrs Funker has granted me a morning pass to get off base and head on over.

So, Melbourne modellers and wargamers, weigh anchor/hit the afterburners/put pedal to the metal and let’s make it a big day!

***I am not endorsing these, just relaying information. No-one gives me ‘cash for comment’!***

 

It would appear, after asking wargaming colleagues, that there are two stockists for Plastic Soldier Company in Melbourne (Victoria):

Victorian Hobby Centre

and

Mind Games Melbourne.

One person thinks that Vic Hobby Centre only has 15mm scale products.

Another person suggested a NSW outfit, War and Peace Games. Remember: they are NSW.

That’s all I know….DaveM, up to you what you want to make of it.

 

 

 

 

 

A parcel has arrived…

October 12, 2012

A parcel has arrived…bringing with it the usual glee knowing that something ‘hobby’ has arrived:  .

(I’m glad to see the sender has recycled the box. I myself do the same…we receive many parcel boxes at my place of work, in fantastic sizes for re-sending hobby-sized parcels, and so I always make use of them rather than let them go to be pulped).

It’s the Plastic Soldier Company Panzer IVs:  .

So I have two more boxes to add to the stash  . I should post new stash photos, as it’s grown and spread and sort-of mutated…