It’s only taken two years and ten months, but the Eastern shacks I bought from Mike Parker of Battlefield Accessories are complete! They turned out very nicely too. I recommend them.

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As you can see, the roofs are detachable and each shack almost holds a fire team.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I think I have enough Russian buildings for now. I really need to concetrate on AFVs and guns. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I’ll only buy more Eastern Front buildings if they turn up for good prices at Swap & Sells.

Cobwebs and dust

May 8, 2015

Just done a little sweeping and tidying, as this last week I am recommencing work on miniatures. I’m glad to see many of you whom I had links to are still publishing your blogs!

I can’t say how much I’m going to publish here. Probably just sporadically.

I’m trying to get these peasants’ storage huts out of the way, so I can finish the second platoon of Panthers, and then so I can start work on a number of prebuilt kits I’ve bought that were part of “vehicle graveyard” Ebay lots.

 

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Just working on some Eastern Front peasants’ houses and continuing on with some Panthers. I’ll put the Panthers away as I achieved what I needed to with them today (correct sizing and detailing of thier cammo pattern), so I’ll just keep working with the houses until they are completed and the Panthers can be taken up later.

Baby steps.

Peter’s new KV-1’s

June 18, 2014

Hello all, yes, a rare post from the Eastern Funker.

Peter’s been working on a new company of KV-1 heavy tanks.

He’s been experimenting with a weathering powder. I think the experiment has been a huge success!

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Hello! It’s been a while. And I have another post to do tomorrow or Friday.

But- this doesn’t mean I’m back. These are some of the intermittent appearances I may make. After all, I haven’t switched off transmissions for good yet…

Peter (co-author of the Panzerfaust: Armoured Fist rules) finished working on the Plastic Soldier Company 1/72nd Russian 45mm anti tank guns that he purchased some time ago. Here are his proud pics: 1DSCF45mmL66 2DSCF45mmL66 3DSCF45mmL66 4DSCF45mmL66 5DSCF45mmL66 . Look great, don’t they? Better than what I do! He commented that: “The guns had very few pieces, but the crew had to be stuck together, but looked awesome once done. There were four guns and crews in the box, and there were options to do the 45mmL46 or the 76mm infantry gun. Awesome value for one kit”.

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He and I will be having a game of Panzerfaust:Armoured Fist in a fortnight. First game for me this year!

Stephen C. Willoughby wrote a brilliant article for his local chapter of IPMS called

How Tanks Get Dirty: A column about tanks by an ex-tanker.

I found it the first time whilst reading more after learning the ‘Doug Chaltry technique’ and then lost it’s location because I forgot the keywords I used to find it the first time.

I recently rediscovered it and am glad that some of what he wrote had stuck with me and that I am going part of the way to reproducing armour that has been out & about as opposed to fresh off the assembly line or kept in a museum. And I wanted to share it with you!

 

I completed my Soviet Armoured Car Company, bringing it to the recommended strength of five vehicles thanks to finishing the final three earlier this week. The final three are a BA-I (БА-И), BA-6 (БА-6) and BA-10 (БА-10). You’ll recall the first two vehicles of this company, finished back in February, were a BA-9 (БА-9) and a BA-6M. Here’s the whole company:  and from the air:  .

Here are the three recently completed vehicles together:   .

Here’s the  BA-I (БА-И) by itself:  . Now the BA-10 (БА-10):  . Lastly the funky-looking BA-6 (БА-6), first from the side  and then three quarter profile:  …great idea, just to whack the tank turret from the T-26 onto the armoured car body…

I really like this camouflage (камуфляж) scheme, that I got from this link: “BA-6 from the Separate Recon Battalion /1st Tank Division/1st Mechcorps, The North-western Front, Krasnogvardeysk (Gatchina) region, August 1941″ – it’s lots of fun to paint.

If you look closely at those trees in the background, you might recognise some of them from this earlier post of mine.

So, in the space of a few months I’ve added two more companies to my Soviet forces. That’s enough for now, as they are not my primary army. It’d be good to pick up a couple of Airfix T-34s (as kits or assembled) so I could complete my company of T-34/76s, but I’ve not seen any at the swap & sells this year…funny, as there were plenty of them around in the previous few years.

Now, strictly speaking the rules state that all vehicles in a company must look the same so they cannot be confused as others. I’m going to argue that they all have the same basic body and will play all as the same type, even if they actually are different models that I have. A whole company for $50 as opposed to having to pay full price for the same UM kit new…$225 for a company?! Sorry. I’m on a budget,these trainees aren’t cheap to train.

I’ll reiterate what I said about rubber tyres from the SU-85 kits (those were UM kits; these BA’s are UM kits too and they have real rubber tyres) – great if you can do them perfectly, but I cannot and so I have to paint over them, sometimes numerous times…and the effort to get them onto the hubcabs is a nuisance too. I’m happy with plastic tyres.

 

 

 

I’ve been really busy supervising Trainee Funker, but I do get the occasional moment to look at my hobbies too. I’m pleased to report that, with the glorious sunny & warm Spring weather yesterday (and with Trainee Funker using his free time to nap), I finished the UM Models/UniModels SU-85s I’ve been working on for some time.

Here they are, with the one I completed some months ago on the left side facing right, and the other four I completed yesterday in the middle and on the right side, facing left:  . Detail of the company commander’s vehicle:  . Details of the muddiest vehicle – but it gets far muddier on the Eastern Front:  . A few of the vehicles on a different angle:  . An aerial view:  – it helps bring out the detail courtesy of the PE/photoetched brass grill on the back of each vehicle. Here’s the company commander’s tank again:  just to show the proper colour that I used (Citadel’s Catachan Green) – and again to show the side in the shade:  .

I’m glad they are finished. I especially found the roadwheels troublesome, both during assembly and painting. Having real rubber may be authentic, but it’s only authentic if no accidents happen to them like glue drips on them or paint splashes on them. If those happen, it’s all wasted, because then you have to paint the whole black rubber tyre black to cover up your mistakes.

I still like UM kits – I think they are pretty detailed and they do cover some creations no-one else covers. But any future purchases by me will exclude kits involving real rubber tyres wherever possible.

Thanos, over at his Miniatures and Terrain blog, recently did a great post about making your own sandbags and then painting them.

I like it because he is working with some of the same paints that I am (Citadel, by Games Workshop) and he makes everything look so easy and professional.

What are you waiting for? Go have a look!

 

UM’s SU-85 and Dragon’s 251/10’s:  .

The SU-85:  . The 251/10’s:  and .

The 251/10 cannons were more difficult to assemble than the instructions suggested they should be. They required some carving and filing to get the barrels to properly fit through the gun shields.

The remaining 4 SU-85’s (making a company in total) have finished assembly and are now just awaiting painting.