I was meant to put this online last year, but somehow overlooked it. As part of a New Year’s email cleanout, I found it again. So, I present to you:

Rem Ulanov, SU-76M commander
Source: “Tankomaster” No. 4, 1997
Translation: Bair Irincheev

Not much about fighting, but some details about unit strengths and also lots of anecdotes about life as a Russian tanker.

 

This last game of Panzerfaust: Armoured Fist (click this link to get the rules for free) for 2012 was to be an Encounter scenario, using forces most likely to represent reconnaissance forces. The date is March, 1942. The failed drive to Moscow is a fresh and sore memory.

Forces are searching for each other in the regions west of Moscow. For Weather, a 6 was rolled – Clear. For Wind, a 1 – Still.

Here’s the map/board for the night: 1 Map 1 2 Map 2

Turn 1:

The Germans 3 details 1 could already see a company of BA armoured cars that were advancing at high speed. I order to try to reach better positions before engaging, I decided the Germans would all move at Full Movement speed.

More Russians then came into view after my movement, including infantry on horseback 4 details 2 .

The Russians had already set up some anti-tank guns 5 Russian 45mm L 56 ATGs . A 45mm L56 fired on a Pz 38(t) but missed. Being a small gun and at some distance, the Germans couldn’t see its muzzle flash and so couldn’t try to fire speculatively at it.

Russian 122mm artillery is attempted to be called down onto the Pz 38(t)’s. An 8 is required; a 4 is rolled. It’ll come down next turn (Peter did this too late in the turn and so penalised himself by delaying its arrival).

Turn 2:

All German forces continued moving at full speed 6 Germans moving at full .  The Russian 45mm L56 on the hill fired again, missing again. The BA company 7 What the Germans could see  all fire at my Pz 38(t) platoon and all miss. The Russian artillery comes down but only affects a Pz 38(t) on the wing, Stunning it for 2 turns.

Turn 3:

I roll 5 pips for my actions. Good, I need it to get everyone firing at the Communist hordes. I choose to continue advancing the company as a whole (so my two motorised infantry platoons continue to move forward to optimal combat positions) 8 Germans continuing to move at full but I spend pips halting my two armour platoons.

My SdKfz 222’s roll brilliantly, and cause three BA’s to be tracked. The Pz 38(t)’s hit the same BA’s, knocking the gun out on one and causing the crews to bail out of two others 10 Russians taking hits too .

As a result of this savage fighting, the BA company have to test morale. They are Stunned for 6 turns! But – they can still shoot, it just means they can’t advance – so I still have to be careful.

By now the other Russian 45mm anti-tank guns are set up and open fire, knocking out a Pz 38(t). Another hits my already-Stunned Pz 38(t) causing it to be tracked, then a third hit forces its crew to bail out  . I have to test the Morale of the Pz 38(t) platoon. I roll a 7, which is modified to 5 because of the Russian artillery fire, so we are fine (a roll that ends up being modified to 2 or below is bad).

A SdKfz 222 is hit and the crew bail out 9 Germans taking hits . I test the platoon’s morale – 3 – they are Shaken. I rolled to see how many turns they are Shaken for – 6! Drat.

Now I test my company’s Morale. 7, modified to 6; no problem.

Turn 4:

I move everyone, armour at full speed but infantry at 5cm so that the infantry vehicles (SdKfz 251/10’s) can shoot. Some infantry vehicles have stopped moving, allowing the troops to race into the buildings 11 Turn4 results 1 .

There is mass Russian shooting. A Pz 38(t) is tracked. My SdKfz 251/1’s use their LMGs to wipe out some Russian infantry with AT rifles.

The tracked Pz 38(t) fails his Morale check but the rest of the platoon passes.

Turn 5:

My infantry have all leaped off their 251/1’s and 251/10’s (apart from those needed to operate those vehicles’ weapons). Some are able to swarm into the hamlet’s hall (the game’s objective) and surrounding houses. But they lie low, as the Russians don’t know they are there and the opportunity to ambush is too good to pass up.

My SdKfz 222’s use their LMGs and 20mm cannons on the second platoon of 45mm L56’s, wiping out the whole platoon at once. But it’s not all good news, as the German guns and Russian guns have simultaneous firing times – so the L56’s shoot and score three hits on the SdKfz 222’s, killing the platoon commander and causing the others to surrender to the Russians.

I test my company Morale – 8 – fine.

A 251/10 lands a shell on a BA and stuns it.

My 50mm infantry mortars fail to land their shells on opposing Russian footsloggers. The 251/1’s let rip with their LMGs at the same footsloggers and kill a few 12 Turn5 results 1 .

My other 251/10 is destroyed and that platoon’s Morale fails.

I test the whole (surviving) company Morale – 5, modified to 1…Shaken. I can’t advance, but I’m still in the game 13 Turn5 results 2 .

Turn 6:

We declared this would be the final turn, as it was 11.30pm.

The 45mm L56’s on the hill hit my Pz 38(t)’s and kill the platoon HQ; the game ended right there 14 Turn6 as my Morale was now too low to continue fighting.

So I lost (as usual) but this time did reach the objective and occupy it (briefly). I’m improving each year! 1 win, 3 losses for 2012. Next year, I want to have 2 wins and 2 losses.

***

Here are some photos of other games being played at NWA that night:

Other games 1 Other games 2 Other games 3 Other games 4 Other games 5 Other games 6 . Those Warhammer 40K dudes? some of them are Stephen/cheetah185’s. You can see photos of his Warhammer 40K project on his blog, In my own time.

 

 

I’ve recently stumbled across some YouTube work by a user named yolkhere. Yolkhere makes videos by joining electronic music to historical footage. My favourite is the video for the BT-7:

– that music is fantastic to listen to when assembling model kits, when painting model kits or when playing World of Tanks.

The three other notable videos are –

the KV-1:  ;

the T-34/76 (model 1942/43):  and the T-34/76 (model 1941/42):  .

I went and made all four into a playlist, I was so impressed.

I hope you enjoy them, too.

***

Peter and I did have a game last friday night. AAR to come this weekend or so, OK?

 

I feel terrible that I don’t check up on the War and Game blog more often. It’s a great historical blog and archive. I’m glad I did catch up with it last week, as it recently had a great little post all about the Wehrmachtskanister – or what the Allies called the “jerrycan”. Go read about its brilliant design and why the Allies copied it!

Online worlds…of tanks

November 22, 2012

The way the Trainee has been lately, it’s been hard to find modelling time. When I do my modelling, I need at least a 30 minute block in order to get anything done. (I know some of you will disagree and say much could be done, but it’s not, given the way I like to do my modelling work).

So, I started playing World Of Tanks, an online, real-time WWII-&-a-few-years-after tank combat simulator. Free and fun. Organise your own team or be randomly allocated to teams for each battle. The way I play (as a newbie, pretty poorly, rarely scoring a kill) a game is only 5-10 minutes long.

The maps are of a number of WWII theatres, including a few from the Eastern Front.

That all being said, I did work on painting some kits last night, so I’m not completely lost to it yet!

Trainee Funker was not obeying any orders for a while during last saturday morning and I nearly didn’t get to go to Bayonet Military Model Club’s modelling competition & swap ‘n sell YET AGAIN…however, he finally responded to discipline and so I was able to hit the Western Ring Road and Princes Highway down to Werribee.

The trip is worth it for the B-24 Liberator alone. Here are my photos – approaching the restoration hanger (the competition and swap ‘n sell is inside, along with the plane):  , and now inside, looking at real, restored history:  ,  ,  ,  ,  , some of the business purposes of the vehicle –  , great campaign pitch  – hard to say ‘no’ to that!,  ,  , “pilot to gunner!” –  ,  ,  ,  , again the business reasons –   , their contact details on their advertising trailer if you want to find out more:  .

I scored pretty heavily at this swap ‘n sell:  .

  • 2 T-34/76’s (in 1:76 scale, though) to add to my existing 8 which gives me a complete company;
  • 2 250/9’s which added to my existing kits now gives me two platoons and a spare of these recon vehicles;
  • 2 recovery KVs for particular scenarios;
  • 3 KV-2’s which, if I add to my existing 3, gives me more than a company. But the first three KV-2’s I assembled and painted weren’t painted very well, so I might just give them to Trainee Funker when he’s older and start afresh with these;
  • 3 ISU-152s to add to my existing three which gives me a company plus a spare;
  • a total of five KV-1’s (there is no real difference between these two kits) which is a whole company straight off. I already have a whole company of KV-1’s, in the same situation as my KV-2’s. Two companies? Or one for me and one for the Trainee?

Pretty darned good, if you’ll agree. Plus, all those PST kits were a paltry $5 each, all sealed and in perfect condition. So, $65 bought 13 kits. All the above cost a total of $99.

Here are ‘drool’ photos of some of what was available:  (a fair whack of this stuff can home with me – this was taken upon my arrival at the venue);  ; wow, 1/ 6 scale stuff!:  ;  ;  ;  ;  ; even 1/1 scale stuff for re-enactors…  .

A great way to spend a morning. See some real history and buy some small-scale plastic replica history. Thanks for organising it, Bayonet Military Model Club, and I hope to attend every year from now on!

There are a couple of lowlights to this product, however.

The roadwheels are cast as one piece, whereas in reality they were two separate wheels with a gap inbetween for the track guide teeth:   – now, I’m reliably informed by far more experienced reviewers that making model kits is extremely difficult and all molds used to cast model kit pieces will always have some drawbacks…this is one of the drawbacks here. Given that where the gap will be should end up painted black anyway (to represent the rubber on the rim of the roadwheel) then it shouldn’t be too much of a problem.

The other lowlight is the hull machinegun:   .

I’m going to to follow the advice of others and remove it. I’ve got plenty of ESCI/Italeri surplus machineguns lying around in my spares box… I’ll cut one up and use it instead.

I’ve got some other kits on the go at the moment, but these are definitely going to be moved up the priority list – they will be comparatively quick to do, as it’s mostly just painting!

There are a few highlights to these fast-build kits by PSC.

First, you get not one, but two commander figures for each tank:  – check out the sculpting! Nicely done, will drybrush/highlight/wash up very nicely. Plus a spare commander to use elsewhere.

Second, you get stowage such as jerrycans:  and spare roadwheels:  .

Third, you get pre-made track sag:    .

I don’t have to break out the cut-off matchsticks, cut-off icecream sticks and cut-off chopsticks that I would normally use to try to replicate track sag with!

A parcel has arrived…

October 12, 2012

A parcel has arrived…bringing with it the usual glee knowing that something ‘hobby’ has arrived:  .

(I’m glad to see the sender has recycled the box. I myself do the same…we receive many parcel boxes at my place of work, in fantastic sizes for re-sending hobby-sized parcels, and so I always make use of them rather than let them go to be pulped).

It’s the Plastic Soldier Company Panzer IVs:  .

So I have two more boxes to add to the stash  . I should post new stash photos, as it’s grown and spread and sort-of mutated…

 

 

 

From The Telegraph’s website:

British farmer’s quest to find lost Spitfires in Burma

A Lincolnshire farmer has told how he spent 15 years trying to find a lost squadron of Spitfires that was buried in Burma at the end of the Second World War.

Read the whole article here!