The UM Model armoured cars (Бронеавтомобиль) are done!

I mentioned in my previous post that I was getting carried away with how much weathering/how much of a ‘dust coat’ I drybrush onto my vehicles…these photos show that I had gone overboard with these paticulr two kits. If I buy more of these kits to make a platoon, the rest will also be heavily coated like this…but no other kit , regardless what Nation they are for, will get this dusty in the future. It’s too much, methinks.

The kits paint up well, as you can see. I think they would benefit from adding on some extra stowage…I added a toolbox onto the right rear mudguard of one…but I guess some more research is really needed before committing to that recommendation too seriously.

Also, I finished painting up the building and industrial chimney/smokestack I bought at a model train sale back in November. I applied plenty of black as soot and plenty of black ink as fine soot/smoke: . Here’s the building by itself: and here’s the chimney or smokestack by itself: . Together, they could represent some sort of a furnace or smelter, a coal-fired electric power station or any other sort of industrial plant requiring the burning of lots of coal or wood. The colour scheme used was heavily based on that used for the Airfix engine sheds I finished last year.

I also completed an Italeri StuG III, much needed for tomorrow night’s game: .

I have a bare hobby table for the first time in months and I’ll try to keep it bare until Saturday arvo…have a bit of a rest from it all, so I can start some other kits with a clear mind.

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I decided to put all this finished stuff into a little diorama. Russian recon forces are about to find something that might well prove fatal… .

 

 

I did the camouflage schemes for the UM BA-6M (БА–6M) and BA-9 (БА-9).

Here they are with a base coat of Kommando Khaki and primary camouflage pattern of Catachan Green:

Here they are with the secondary camouflage scheme of black (done here with Chaos Black): .

I reckon that’s a pretty fair go at recreating the camouflage on the “BA-6 from the Separate Recon Battalion /1st Tank Division/1st Mechcorps, The North-western Front, Krasnogvardeysk (Gatchina) region, August 1941″ .

I could only glue on a few tiny bits & pieces onto these models until I got up to the wheels. Now, the instructions state that the rubber tyres (and yes, they are made with real rubber!)  should not be glued into place, but simply fitted onto the (plastic) wheel hubs and then left alone. The completed wheels can then be glued onto axles etc.

I decided that I didn’t want to undercoat the rubber during undercoating of a completed vehicle  in case the rubber was affected in some way (I’ve had bad experiences with this with rubber terrain). I decided to undercoat everything, assembled and unassembled, before fixing the tyres onto the hubs. So, everything got undercoated.

The remaining assembly took comparatively little time. Here’s how they look, undercoated, assembled and awaiting a proper paint job – first the

BA-6M (БА–6M) and BA-9 (БА-9) together: .

Here’s the BA-6M (БА–6M) by itself: . This armoured car (Бронеавтомобиль, in Russian) is the more useful of the two to me, so during assembly I checked each sprue of both kits carefully and, if some parts on one sprue were more poorly formed or in worse condition than others, I made sure this kit got the best parts.

Now for the BA-9 (БА-9) by itself: . From a distance, this vehicle looks OK. A closer inspection shows the hull-mounted smaller machinegun is ‘bent’ in the middle. This was because the remaining light machinegun available on all the sprues (as one was missing) useable for this kit was broken in two, and this was the best I could do to repair it. Closer inspection also shows that the only accurate towing hook is attached to the rear right…the other three towing hooks I took from surplus Roden Opel Blitz sprues, so this BA-9 is being kept in operation by salvaged parts.

The next stage is a proper paintjob.

The lazy option is just to do overall Russian Green. Since so much of Russian stuff is already Russian Green (and a fair proportion of the unassembled stuff will end up Russian Green too) I decided to do some internet research to see about more interesting paint schemes/camouflage schemes.

Via the RKKA in World War II website, I found some useful stuff, most importantly a whole page on the BA-6 & BA-6M, featuring some recreations of actual camouflage schemes. Fantastic! The “BA-6 from the Separate Recon Battalion /1st Tank Division/1st Mechcorps, The North-western Front, Krasnogvardeysk (Gatchina) region, August 1941” looks like one to try! Oh, and back at the top of the BA-6 page, you can see a BA-6 camouflaged with twigs and branches on the move…

It’s an interesting camouflage (камуфляж) scheme, that one for the 1st Mechanised Corps – it’ll be a good challenge to reproduce. The Russians did camouflage some of their stuff, so always having boring Russian Green paintjobs/camouflage can sometimes be bypassed by us wargamers…just do a little research first.

 

 

 

 

I visited a private seller who was clearing out unwanted model kits last week. Whilst browsing through a lot of Soviet light tanks, I found a BA-10 (in Russian, БА-10) by UM Models . Being fairly impressed with previous UM kits, I decided to buy it…$10 was a reasonable price and it would make a start towards building up Soviet recon stuff, of which both Peter and I are lacking.

I was pleasantly surprised, when I opened it, to find two kits inside: .

Both are two-thirds assembled. I’m hoping each bag has been labelled correctly! There are no instructions for either, but I can get them from Henk of Holland’s wonderful repository.

I decided to start with the bag labelled BA-9: . I’m unfamiliar with Soviet armoured cars (or Бронеавтомобиль in Russian) – it looks like it has a light-calibre main gun, maybe even a machinegun or automatic cannon instead of a normal cannon: . Some reading courtesy of the English version of The Russian Battlefield website confirms that it is a machinegun, a 12.7-mm DK machine-gun, and that this vehicle is a BA-9 (БА-9 in Russian) . For Panzerfaust: Armoured Fist purposes, a 12.-7mm MG is a HMG.

Now for the BA-6m (БА–6M). It’s in a similar state to the BA-9:  . Looking at it’s main armament, it does seem to have a 45mm cannon, like most later BA armoured cars do: . Both the BA-6M and the BA-10 had the same armament, so this vehicle also seems to be correctly labelled.

So all up, a good deal! A cheap, useful purchase actually yielded two useful, even cheaper, purchases! As Paul from “Plastic Warriors” says, “model on!”

As both have been partially assembled, I have decided to finish assembly of both before undercoating them. I’ve been doing some research about Russian armoured cars so I’ll be sharing more about them with you over the weeks and months it takes me to finish.