I completed my Soviet Armoured Car Company, bringing it to the recommended strength of five vehicles thanks to finishing the final three earlier this week. The final three are a BA-I (БА-И), BA-6 (БА-6) and BA-10 (БА-10). You’ll recall the first two vehicles of this company, finished back in February, were a BA-9 (БА-9) and a BA-6M. Here’s the whole company:  and from the air:  .

Here are the three recently completed vehicles together:   .

Here’s the  BA-I (БА-И) by itself:  . Now the BA-10 (БА-10):  . Lastly the funky-looking BA-6 (БА-6), first from the side  and then three quarter profile:  …great idea, just to whack the tank turret from the T-26 onto the armoured car body…

I really like this camouflage (камуфляж) scheme, that I got from this link: “BA-6 from the Separate Recon Battalion /1st Tank Division/1st Mechcorps, The North-western Front, Krasnogvardeysk (Gatchina) region, August 1941″ – it’s lots of fun to paint.

If you look closely at those trees in the background, you might recognise some of them from this earlier post of mine.

So, in the space of a few months I’ve added two more companies to my Soviet forces. That’s enough for now, as they are not my primary army. It’d be good to pick up a couple of Airfix T-34s (as kits or assembled) so I could complete my company of T-34/76s, but I’ve not seen any at the swap & sells this year…funny, as there were plenty of them around in the previous few years.

Now, strictly speaking the rules state that all vehicles in a company must look the same so they cannot be confused as others. I’m going to argue that they all have the same basic body and will play all as the same type, even if they actually are different models that I have. A whole company for $50 as opposed to having to pay full price for the same UM kit new…$225 for a company?! Sorry. I’m on a budget,these trainees aren’t cheap to train.

I’ll reiterate what I said about rubber tyres from the SU-85 kits (those were UM kits; these BA’s are UM kits too and they have real rubber tyres) – great if you can do them perfectly, but I cannot and so I have to paint over them, sometimes numerous times…and the effort to get them onto the hubcabs is a nuisance too. I’m happy with plastic tyres.

 

 

 

Nunawading Wargames Association (NWA) is the wargaming club I belong to, and have done for almost two decades.

I toddled along to have a look at what my fellow members were demonstrating for the annual Open Day, which is six hours of participatory and demonstration games for the public to take part in.

To be fair to my blog, I’ll only show you WWII Eastern Front, which was being run by my good colleague cheetah185, and whose blog In my own time I have already linked to (see my set of links to other blogs). Cheetah185 and mates were running a Stalingrad game. Here’s their explanation to the public of what is being presented:  . Here’s the map/board:    – notice all the aircraft? Russian fighters and German bombers. Here are photos of the action:      .

I did some shopping – I had to! I bought a Raupenschlepper Ost with Flak kit by ACE Models and I bought four resin Russian shacks from Mike Parker @ Battlefield Accessories:  . The Russian shacks will serve as animal pens, wood sheds, farm worker’s shelters, hunter’s lodges or whatever they are required for. Here are photos of the details of these shacks:    and for scale purposes, here’s a BA armoured car parked right next to/in front of one:  .

 

 

More purchases…

July 1, 2012

Chris K., a private seller I’ve had some trade with over the last 7 months, turned up at NWA on friday night, to sell off unwanted model kits, both unassembled and assembled.

Here are two photos of most of what he had on offer:   – most of what he had because some very speedy NWA members had already snaffled a few things! You’ll see a good colleague’s hand on the right in the first photo, choosing his purchases…

I bought three more Soviet armoured cars, so now I have a complete platoon of five, which is a suitable recon group. The three I bought were the BA-1, the BA-6 and the BA-10, all by UM Models. I’ll be playing all my Soviet armoured cars as the same type, even though they are all actually slightly different. At $10 each, I can’t afford to be too choosy! Oh, and longer-term readers to this blog will recall the first two BA armoured cars I completed back in February…these latest purchases will be painted the same way.

I visited a private seller who was clearing out unwanted model kits last week. Whilst browsing through a lot of Soviet light tanks, I found a BA-10 (in Russian, БА-10) by UM Models . Being fairly impressed with previous UM kits, I decided to buy it…$10 was a reasonable price and it would make a start towards building up Soviet recon stuff, of which both Peter and I are lacking.

I was pleasantly surprised, when I opened it, to find two kits inside: .

Both are two-thirds assembled. I’m hoping each bag has been labelled correctly! There are no instructions for either, but I can get them from Henk of Holland’s wonderful repository.

I decided to start with the bag labelled BA-9: . I’m unfamiliar with Soviet armoured cars (or Бронеавтомобиль in Russian) – it looks like it has a light-calibre main gun, maybe even a machinegun or automatic cannon instead of a normal cannon: . Some reading courtesy of the English version of The Russian Battlefield website confirms that it is a machinegun, a 12.7-mm DK machine-gun, and that this vehicle is a BA-9 (БА-9 in Russian) . For Panzerfaust: Armoured Fist purposes, a 12.-7mm MG is a HMG.

Now for the BA-6m (БА–6M). It’s in a similar state to the BA-9:  . Looking at it’s main armament, it does seem to have a 45mm cannon, like most later BA armoured cars do: . Both the BA-6M and the BA-10 had the same armament, so this vehicle also seems to be correctly labelled.

So all up, a good deal! A cheap, useful purchase actually yielded two useful, even cheaper, purchases! As Paul from “Plastic Warriors” says, “model on!”

As both have been partially assembled, I have decided to finish assembly of both before undercoating them. I’ve been doing some research about Russian armoured cars so I’ll be sharing more about them with you over the weeks and months it takes me to finish.