Trainee Funker was not obeying any orders for a while during last saturday morning and I nearly didn’t get to go to Bayonet Military Model Club’s modelling competition & swap ‘n sell YET AGAIN…however, he finally responded to discipline and so I was able to hit the Western Ring Road and Princes Highway down to Werribee.

The trip is worth it for the B-24 Liberator alone. Here are my photos – approaching the restoration hanger (the competition and swap ‘n sell is inside, along with the plane):  , and now inside, looking at real, restored history:  ,  ,  ,  ,  , some of the business purposes of the vehicle –  , great campaign pitch  – hard to say ‘no’ to that!,  ,  , “pilot to gunner!” –  ,  ,  ,  , again the business reasons –   , their contact details on their advertising trailer if you want to find out more:  .

I scored pretty heavily at this swap ‘n sell:  .

  • 2 T-34/76’s (in 1:76 scale, though) to add to my existing 8 which gives me a complete company;
  • 2 250/9’s which added to my existing kits now gives me two platoons and a spare of these recon vehicles;
  • 2 recovery KVs for particular scenarios;
  • 3 KV-2’s which, if I add to my existing 3, gives me more than a company. But the first three KV-2’s I assembled and painted weren’t painted very well, so I might just give them to Trainee Funker when he’s older and start afresh with these;
  • 3 ISU-152s to add to my existing three which gives me a company plus a spare;
  • a total of five KV-1’s (there is no real difference between these two kits) which is a whole company straight off. I already have a whole company of KV-1’s, in the same situation as my KV-2’s. Two companies? Or one for me and one for the Trainee?

Pretty darned good, if you’ll agree. Plus, all those PST kits were a paltry $5 each, all sealed and in perfect condition. So, $65 bought 13 kits. All the above cost a total of $99.

Here are ‘drool’ photos of some of what was available:  (a fair whack of this stuff can home with me – this was taken upon my arrival at the venue);  ; wow, 1/ 6 scale stuff!:  ;  ;  ;  ;  ; even 1/1 scale stuff for re-enactors…  .

A great way to spend a morning. See some real history and buy some small-scale plastic replica history. Thanks for organising it, Bayonet Military Model Club, and I hope to attend every year from now on!

I’ve completed the major stages of assembly of UniModel’s 1/72 scale SU-85 (or, if you are Russian, 333 UM 1/72 Самоходная артиллерийская установка СУ-85):   . It’s a well-detailed kit, but I think there must be better ways to actually assemble the kit than the way they suggest on the instruction sheet. Since this is the first of a company of 5 that I’m assembling, I’ll assemble the other 4 in a different way. The reason for wanting to do it differently is that, having followed their instructions, part fit of the superstructure to the hull was poor – out came the nail files and there was a lot of filing in order to get part fit, let alone accurate part fit. Not good. I’m reminded of some of the grizzles with assembly I had with the Marder III (h)’s of theirs that I did 4-5 years ago. So, we’ll see how the rest of them go. This one isn’t too bad, but it certainly isn’t going to be the company commander’s vehicle.

Also, I completed the Pegasus Hobbies 1/72 scale Russian Log house – Two storey (Large Karilian region izba) that I won as part of a number of job lots on eBay three years back. Mine looks like this from the front:  and like this at the rear: . It’s to scale, as you can see here, with 1/72 troops (ESCI/Italeri, in this instance):   . It’s meant to be a two-storey building, but there is no “first floor” provided, so I made one with leftover sheet styrene:  so I can have snipers upstairs if I want:  and the first floor sections easily lift out and away for when the door finally gets broken in and close-quarters combat (CQC) occurs:  . As you can see, it is a very big building. Great for diorama or scale modellers, but I think that for wargaming, it occupies too much of the tabletap. I don’t mind a factory or somesuch taking up big slabs of the tabletop, but I’m not so sure a large farmhouse (Russian: изба́) should share that right.

So, now I have a good collection of buildings by Pegasus and MiniArt for the Russian side of the Eastern Front (Ostfront):  – that should be enough for a few years.

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My Dragon 251/10’s are coming along a bit more slowly at the moment, as you have to paint the interiors before you can fully assemble the bodies:  .

 

The UM Model armoured cars (Бронеавтомобиль) are done!

I mentioned in my previous post that I was getting carried away with how much weathering/how much of a ‘dust coat’ I drybrush onto my vehicles…these photos show that I had gone overboard with these paticulr two kits. If I buy more of these kits to make a platoon, the rest will also be heavily coated like this…but no other kit , regardless what Nation they are for, will get this dusty in the future. It’s too much, methinks.

The kits paint up well, as you can see. I think they would benefit from adding on some extra stowage…I added a toolbox onto the right rear mudguard of one…but I guess some more research is really needed before committing to that recommendation too seriously.

Also, I finished painting up the building and industrial chimney/smokestack I bought at a model train sale back in November. I applied plenty of black as soot and plenty of black ink as fine soot/smoke: . Here’s the building by itself: and here’s the chimney or smokestack by itself: . Together, they could represent some sort of a furnace or smelter, a coal-fired electric power station or any other sort of industrial plant requiring the burning of lots of coal or wood. The colour scheme used was heavily based on that used for the Airfix engine sheds I finished last year.

I also completed an Italeri StuG III, much needed for tomorrow night’s game: .

I have a bare hobby table for the first time in months and I’ll try to keep it bare until Saturday arvo…have a bit of a rest from it all, so I can start some other kits with a clear mind.

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I decided to put all this finished stuff into a little diorama. Russian recon forces are about to find something that might well prove fatal… .

 

 

Best link for 2011

December 27, 2011

I haven’t linked to as much this year as I did last year, but then I also didn’t post as much this year as I did last year.

These are the links, in date descending order (librarian tech speak) that I feel are worth nominating as candidates for best link for 2011:

“10 minutes spent on terrain each day keeps the guilt doctor away” – after Paul, from his ‘Plastic Warriors’ blog – November 21

The 7.92 mm Pz B39 – what is it? – July 4

What does it look like inside a company that makes plastic model kits? – May 20

It’s a tree-basing bonanza… – May 6

Camouflage – how good is yours? – April 21

If you are good enough, you could make your own toy soldiers… – April 4

and lastly:

How we modellers can help Japan – March 15

Paul from “Plastic Warriors” has two great posts in here, and Bunkermeister’s one about helping Japan in the wake of the Fukushima disaster is very good too. To be able to find a good review about historical weapons was very helpful and something I didn’t think I’d find so readily. The camouflage on the Maus from the “Modelling Madness” is lots of fun, and seeing inside Italeri was unprecedented.

All the links above are well worth a visit. If you haven’t seen these while reading my blog throughout the year (or if you are a recent newcomer to my blog), hop to it. You’ll enjoy them.

The winner, though, are the photos from inside Italeri that a member of the Modellismo Piu model-making forum shared.

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I didn’t get any model kits for Christmas, if you’re wondering.

 

 

 

 

 

A package arrives!

It’s from our man in Taiwan, Bryan! Nurse, scalpel! The first incision…

Carefully, carefully, keep going…

Now, remove all internal organs for examination…

6 Pak 40s and crew – medical name “servants”, for some reason…a set of Russian houses…the contents of a box of German infantry – oh, and look, there is a benign growth of German mortar teams! Fascinating!

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Yes, another successful order from Bryan at Always Model. 3 packs of the Italeri PaK 40 with Servants,  a pack of Pegasus Hobbie’s Russian houses, a pack of Pegasus Hobbies’ German Mortars and lastly a pack of Italeri German Infantry.

Why 3 packs of the PaK 40? Here’s a clue…can you say “Eastern Funker now has a company of PaK 40s?”

I knew you could!

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This post’s title is a line from my favourite ‘Young Ones’ episode, ‘Nasty’. Here’s a link to the script. Here’s a link to the first part of that episode on YouTube.

…and my current job is to paint the interiors of those Dragon Sd. Kfz. 251/1Ds.

Here’s a photo of my work so far: – there’s some Anti-tank Rifle lads also being properly dressed and kitted.

These Dragon kits have really good interior details; unlike the Italeri (very plain) and the Hasegawa (some nice bits, some plain bits). I decided that I had to paint these finely detailed Dragon kits to an equally fine standard – so the interiors are being done completely before the two halfs of the kit are glued together. It’s slowing me down, but I think it’ll be worth it.

 

Entrenching my troops

August 16, 2011

At some time in the last 18 months, I bought some fortifications from Battlefield Accessories. The particular ones I bought have three sides and are made of dug earth reinforced by wood and topped by sandbags. You can see the four I bought and have finished painting and flocking here: . I thought they would be good for indicating which of my guns were dug-in or entrenched and which are not. Here they are with my PaK 40s: .

They are well cast from resin, are single pieces with minimal bubbles or flashing to deal with. I wash mine in warm-to-hot water with dishwashing liquid in it. I then undercoat them (when dry) with Citadel spraycan Chaos Black and they take Citadel Paints well.  Hopefully I’ll be using them in a game against Peter soon.

As promised, here are the photos of the four StuGs I’ve been working on while tackling the tree armatures over the last few months.

The group photo:  .

The Italeri StuGs:   – yes I deliberately did one without the MG-34 set up behind it’s shield. I did that for variety; for recognition eg. ‘Peter’s just blown up my 2IC vehicle, dang it!!!” and also because the default position was shield down and MG-34 stowed inside the StuG anway! It also added to the appearance that that StuG is en route to somewhere else and so isn’t meant to be expecting trouble, hence the jerrycans stowed on its rear deck. I’m modelling a StuG that I saw in a photo from the Bundesarchiv. Closeup photo of this StuG:  . Here’s the two of them one last time, from above:  .

Now the Revell StuGs:     . I’m very happy with how these Revell StuGs turned out – I was using the cammo pattern that Revell recommended –  – but I applied camouflage on the lower sides, where the return rollers and roadwheels were – unlike Revell, who advise to leave it plain DunkelGelb. Why leave those sides plain when they show cammo going to the very bottow of the lower front and rear???

Now I have a platoon of StuGs that I did myself. No more repainted dodgy Airfix stand-ins! To battle!

What does it look like inside a company that makes plastic model kits? If you’ve ever wondered then keep reading, as I have good news…

Through the various websites I read, one had a link to Modellismo Piu, an Italian model-making online forum. One of their members had photos from inside Italeri. Scratch that itch and peek inside a model kit factory’s doors!

Here I am, well over 48 hours of drying time. Nothing more has detached –  . When I handle the tress and shake them upside down fairly strongly, nothing detaches. I could cut off the branches that have lost their foliage and make do – but that would be the problem. I’d be making do. We modellers and wargamers generally take pride in our stuff! Every time I’d look at those three trees, I’d know that they aren’t perfect.

So I put them in the plastic recycling bin.

I suppose the discovery out of all this is not to mix Hob-e-tac and Scenic Cement – make the tree with Hob-e-tac and then use it as is, occasionally glueing fallen foliage back on with more Hob-e-tac, or make the tree using some other glue or glues. I’m going to do it my way with the remaining armatures.

When I get around to doing it, I’ll let you see how I did it here.

While you wait, here are some indoors, insufficient-lighting, flash-needed photos of my finished StuGs!    Better photos on the weekend, weather permitting – my New Zealand colleagues sound like they know what I mean about the weather at the moment.