I was only able to give the tree bases the first of their two coats of Kayak Brown paint before today. Today was glorious Spring-like weather – 18 degrees and very sunny – so I wanted to spray the liquid glue onto the lichen and the armatures to ensure as much adhesion of the two as possible and reinforce the lichen for handling and normal gaming wear & tear.

The first step was to set up a small table and gather everything together: . At this point I’ll clarify something from my previous post…I’m not using PVA glue that I have watered down myself, I’m using Woodland Scenics’ pre-watered down glue which they sell under the name “Scenic Cement”. I’ve been using it before I started this blog and have always been happy with it.

Second step: fill 500ml garden sprayer/mister with glue. Holding sprayer in your good hand, pick up tree in your other hand and hold it upside down. Give it two good sprays from at least 4 different angles: . The third step is to then right the tree (just turn your wrist back to it’s normal position) and give at least one spray from at least 4 different angles and a spray from above too: .

Last step is to place them somewhere sunny to dry: . Done!

Now, I did not attach the trees to broad-enough bases (I just stuck them onto film cannisters) so whilst they were sunning, any puff of wind would just bowl them over and elicit loud toilet words from me (not good when the neighbour’s pre-school kids are playing in the garden next door!). So, I would recommend not following in my footsteps but instead stick them onto someting broader…I normally would use plastic single-serve yoghurt containers, they never tip over.

I like to give any PVA glue at least 24 hours to dry (watered down or not, placed in the sun or not) so the earliest I can put that second coat of Kayak Brown paint onto the bases will be tomorrow night.

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Due to following the wrong instructions, I drilled some holes into the Panzer III turrets and hulls that I did not have to (since I’m not attaching any schürzen). When I realised my mistake, I filled them with Tamiya’s light grey modelling putty. I then decided to respray the black undercoat rather than hope my water-based paints would adhere to it without any priming, so out came the Citadel spraycan of Chaos Black: . Great! Now the dark grey camouflage paint can be painted on.

I made that painting shield by cutting up old boxes. It’s quite useful for stopping spraypaint going everywhere…that being said, I still do my spraypainting outside, away from the house (here, I’ve set it up in the doorway of the shed).

 

With a final black ink wash, what I call the Doug Chaltry technique for painting AFV tracks is done.

I use a mix of 25% Black Ink – 75% water. A previous mix in an earlier post was described as being like milk…well, this mix is like watery milk! Here it is going on the tracks…you can see the raised metal surfaces easily through it – the mix is simply adding some extra shading to crevices etc: and here you can see it pooling together: and to give you another perspective of its strength, here is an almost-dried spilt drop on the upper hull: .

Here are three photos of the final products, all dried: .

With that done, the finishing construction steps in Tankoberg could be undertaken. I glued the hulls onto the lower hulls/chassis, so that I had a whole tank. As the upper wouldn’t sit perfectly on the lower, I used my scalpels to do some trimming on the inside…a major lesson being to ignore UM Models’ assembly advice and not to glue the baggage/stowage that sits on the mudguards until all hull assembly is complete, otherwise it interferes with everything fitting together perfectly! I also had to cut grooves into one side to get a better fit.

I used woodworking clamps to hold the two halves in place for 45 minutes while I waited for the glue to dry.

Having pre-drilled holes in the right place on the hull before assembly, I was able to Zap-a-gap glue in place some 0.022″ diameter brass wire to represent the radio aerials.

Tomorrow: some fine detail glueing (holders for jerry cans etc.)  and some gap filling with putty. Wednesday or thursday…serious detail painting commences.

Painting the two BZ-35s has commenced…finally.  A front wheel fell off one just when I thought all glueing was finished so I had to do more glueing of axles and I also decided to use to Tamiya Putty (Basic type) to really lock down the wheels on the rear axles.

The finished product is nice to look at, though. Definitely a worthwhile PST kit to get if you want to game the Eastern Front (or Ostfront)…sadly, it seems PST has gone very quiet of late and so you may have to hunt around hobby shops and/or Ebay to get them. It’s really a shame, because I’ve also assembled and painted their Soviet KV-1s and KV-2s (in 1:72 scale, of course) and they turned out very well.

The silly title for this post is because while working on assembling the front of each refuelling truck, the instruction sheet said I had to glue on the radiator caps.

Yes, glue on a tiny radiator cap.

On the sprue, was indeed a tiny little radiator cap.

“Well”, I thought, “that’s detail for you. They could have easily included the radiator cap fixed in place as part of the mould, but to show you how much external detail this kit can have, they’ve given me a radiator cap to glue on”. It goes right where there is a bit of flash that actually looks like a radiator cap already, which just makes it seem even stranger. (Yes, even the kit assembled two years ago also had this radiator cap-shaped piece of flash on it).

I clipped the radiator caps off and glued them in place, which was a little trickier than I expected – the top of the radiator gently curves, so they initially won’t sit flatly.

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The small hill was finished last sunday, the glue holding the coarse turf on the big one hadn’t fully dried in some patches so I had to re-do it during the week. Today I sprayed it with Scenic Cement to seal it and added some more flock and coarse turf to try to cover up the less successful patches. Tomorrow night I’ll have a look at it – I’m keeping it in a warm room to speed the drying.

Also commenced painting up a shelled house!